See the CSISS fall Newsletter

 

In this issue

  • CSISS end of season updates
  • Garden and yard cleanup
  • Indoor plants and floral arrangements
  • Knotweed treatment – what to expect
  • Pet ownership – do’s and don’ts
  • Partner news and job opportunities

CSISS End of Season Updates

CSISS had a very busy summer season this year.  With 6 full time employees and countless volunteers we have achieved so much!  Here’s a quick rundown of our summer activities.We have:

  • Organized and implemented 11 weed pulls with 9 partner organizations
  • Inventoried 330 invasive plant sites and completed 712  invasive plant surveys
  • Mechanically treated 44 priority invasive plant sites, removing a total of 0.1308 Ha of material
  • Administered 3 herbicide contracts which treated 53 priority sites and 0.8358 ha of infested land
  • Monitored biological agent dispersal at 5 sites
  • Installed 32 “do not mow” signs at roadside knotweed infestations and completed landowner outreach with homeowners having knotweed on their property
  • Completed 121 plankton samples for zebra and quagga mussels at 42 locations across 21 water bodies
  • Attended over 100 events and presentations, directly interacting with more than 2,700 people and reaching over 32,000 people indirectly.
  • Spoke with 22 marina operators, 16 garden centers, and 8 pet stores about preventing the spread of invasive species
  • Spoke to 113 boaters at boat launches and 90 trail users at trail heads about preventing the spread of invasives.
It’s that time of year…
… yard clean-up time!Invasive species can easily get a foothold in your garden, they are often sold in garden centres (you can avoid them by checking out the PlantWise app and information here) and can end up being a real pain in your garden.Make sure you don’t spread them around.  Ensure that all invasive plant parts removed from your garden are bagged and destined for the deep burial part of the landfill (along with household garbage), not your compost or the yard wast pile at the landfill.

Did you know…?
…that some indoor plants can survive and become invasive if allowed to take root outside?  Even some floral arrangements can contain seeds or cuttings that can become a real environmental problem.
Species to watch out for include: english ivy (pictured), yellow archangel, teasel (pictured), baby’s breath, and spurge laurel (often referred to as madrona and used as greenery in floral arrangements).A simple solution is to ensure that all parts of indoor plants and floral arrangements are put in the garbage and not composted.
Have you treated your knotweed this season?
If you began treating knotweed on your property this season you may see it continue to come back over the next year or two.Don’t panic!  This is normal and is easily treated with repeated chemical applications.  Mark your calendar for next spring to have shoots re-treated once they reach about 3-4 feet in height.  Keeping up with these treatments will eventually mean that your property is knotweed free!
Do’s and Don’ts of pet ownership.
DON’T
  • Don’t choose to have a pet if you are not certain you can look after it for the rest of it’s life.
  • Don’t ever let your pet loose into the environment

DO

  • Know you have the lifestyle and resources to look after a pet (take this testto see if you do)
  • Choose species that are not considered invasive – unfortunately European rabbits, American bullfrogs, red-eared sliders and goldfish are all listed as invasive
  • If your circumstances change and you really can’t look after your pet, find a new home or return it to the store you bought it from.
  • Check out the Don’t Let It Loose web page for more information.
Partner’s News / Job Opportunities
Do you have what it takes to make a career in invasive species management?  Central Kootenay Invasive Species Society is looking for a new Executive Director.  See the job posting here.Are you an agricultural producer in the region? The BC Agriculture and Food Climate Action Initiative are beginning a project in the Kootenay and Boundary regions to engage with local agricultural producers to explore how the agricultural sector can adapt to climate change: variable weather and changing shoulder seasons; insect, weed, pest and invasive species pressure; extreme weather events; drier conditions and drought; wildfire risk; and more. Up to $300,000 in seed funding will support collaborative local agricultural adaptation projects following completion of the strategies. Climate Change Adaptation Workshops in Kootenay and Boundary – To register or for more information, contact Harmony Bjarnason at Harmony@BCAgClimateAction.ca or 250-215-5589. Facebook Link: https://www.facebook.com/events/598318477249725/

There are two invasive plant positions on the BC Public Service site working with Province of BC:1. Invasive Species GIS Analyst (STO21) – this position is a temporary assignment that will end March 31 2020.   See at:https://bcpublicservice.hua.hrsmart.com/hr/ats/Posting/view/55147 .

2. Senior Invasive Plant Specialist (LSO4)-  this is a NEW permanent position within the Ministry Invasive Plant Program.   See at:  https://bcpublicservice.hua.hrsmart.com/hr/ats/Posting/view/55145 .      The competition closes November 19th, 2018.  If you have extensive knowledge and expertise in invasive species management and want to be part of a dedicated and passionate team of professionals and technicians, this may be the perfect fit for you.  This new role will provide leadership on key aspects of the invasive plant program, and support strategic initiatives.

Upcoming Events

Shuswap Trails Roundtable. November 21st at the Sicamous & District Recreation Centre. This will be an all-day meeting (9:00 AM – 4:00 PM) and lunch will be provided for registered participants. The purpose of the Roundtable is for people to meet face-to-face, share information, build relationships, provide input and hear updates on the Shuswap Regional Trails Strategy, and ‘talk all things trails’ in the Shuswap. You can read more about the Roundtable and the Strategy here. Register here
International Conference on Aquatic Invasive Species. https://www.icais.org/  October 27-31st, 2019. Montreal, Canada.