Latin name:

Gypsophila paniculata 

Native to:

Eurasia

Regional Distribution:
The distribution of Baby’s Breath in the Columbia-Shuswap is not well known although it has been confirmed in a few locations in and around Golden. Baby’s Breath is generally introduced by nurseries in order to supply flower shops with the dainty blooms that are common in floral arrangements and wedding bouquets.

Description:
Baby’s Breath are perennial plants that produce tap roots up to 4 m deep. These deep tap roots can sustain a plant through drought and poor soil conditions. Numerous small white flowers can be found on short stalks and are often used in floral bouquets or dried flower arrangements.

Control:
The best control is prevention and early action. Do not plant Baby’s Breath in your garden! More information about Baby’s Breath and control options can be found on the Alberta Invasive Plant Council’s website: https://www.abinvasives.ca/factsheets/FS-BabysBreath.pdf 

 

The CSISS and NCES are partnering with Mandy Kellner of Kingbird Consulting on her project which aims to plant native vegetation in the area near the Downie Ponds and the Columbia River near Revelstoke.  This area is currently overgrown with invasive reed canary grass. We will be planting willow and dogwood stakes on  and are looking for enthusiastic volunteers of all ages.

If you would like to help us out in the awesome endeavour, meet us at the Inukshuk at the entrance to the Greenbelt at 1pm on Sunday April 27th. Bring clothes for the elements and a shovel/pitchfork/pruners if you have them. Free pizza and work gloves will be provided!  We are grateful to the CBT and to the CSRD for providing funding for this event.
 

A year ago today, on April 8th 2013, the Columbia Shuswap Invasive Species Society was officially incorporated as a non-profit Society in BC.  Since then we have been working hard to spread the word and raise awareness about invasive species in our region (check out our 2013 Annual Report). Watch for us at your local farmers’ markets & events and contact us if you would like to book a presentation or workshop in your area.  We look forward to continue making a difference in our second season of operation!

 

Latin name:

Rubus armeniacus (also: Rubus discolor)

Native to:

Asia

Regional Distribution:
The distribution of Himalayan blackberry in the Columbia-Shuswap is not well known. Himalayan blackberry are generally introduced as garden food plants before they get out of control and expand into surrounding areas.

Description:

Himalayan blackberry plants are aggressive invaders that produce think canes with sharp prickles. The leaves are generally grouped into fives on first year canes and groups of three on flowering, second yer canes. The flowers range from delicate white to light pink.

Control:
The best control is prevention and early action. Do not plant Himalayan blackberry in your garden! There are native varieties of blackberry that can be grown in their place. More information about Himalayan blackberry and control options can be found on the ISCBC website: http://www.bcinvasives.ca/publications/TIPS/Blackberry_TIPS.pdf

 

Latin name:

Impatiens glandulifera

Native to:

Himalayas

Regional Distribution:
Himalayan balsam (also known as “Policemen’s Helmet”) is found primarily near populations centers in the Columbia Shuswap where it spreads from gardens into nearby waterways and ditches.

Description:
Himalayan balsam is introduced primarily through gardens. It is an impressive annual plant with a large capacity to produce seed pods which explode to disperse up to 7 meters away. Plants can grow up to 2 meters tall and produce pink, sweet smelling hooded flowers.

Control:
The best control is prevention and early action. Do not plant Himalayan balsam in your garden! There are alternative ornamentals that can be grown in their place. Although Himalayan balsam is an annual plant with relatively weak roots and an almost hollow stem its capacity for reproduction makes it very difficult to control once it is established. Hand pull this plant before it goes to seed.

More information about Himalayan balsam control options can be found here: http://www.shim.bc.ca/invasivespecies/_private/himalayan_balsam.htm

Fun facts:
Himalayan balsam can produce up to 2,500 seeds per plant. These seeds can remain viable for up to 18 months and have even been known to germinate under water.

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